Meeting Menu

2023 Fall Meeting – Program

  • The Friday night events will take place in Doyle Hall/Conference Center (#8 on map).
  • Saturday morning will start in Doyle Hall/Conference Center (#8 on map).
  • The contributed talks and student posters will take place in Swan Business Center (#28 on map).
  • Final keynote talk will take place back in Doyle Hall/Conference Center (#8 on map).

Campus Map

Friday – Oct 13

Room: Walsh Auditorium G21

  1. Time:
    3:00 pm – 5:00 pm
    Title:
    Workshop: Real World Applications of Mathematics
    Speaker:
    Darren Narayan, RIT
    Abstract

    This workshop will feature real world applications of mathematics that can be integrated into courses in calculus, discrete mathematics, and graph theory. Teaching strategies and worksheets will be provided. Faculty and students are welcome. This workshop is sponsored by the MAA Subcommittee on Mathematics Across the Disciplines.

Friday – Oct 13

Room: Swan Business Center 200 (Peterson Boardroom)

  1. Time:
    3:00 pm – 6:00 pm
    Title:
    Meetings of the Executive and Extended Executive Committees

Friday – Oct 13

Room: Doyle Conference Center

  1. Time:
    5:30 pm – 6:45 pm
    Title:
    Registration
  2. Time:
    6:00 pm – 6:45 pm
    Title:
    Social hour: Cash bar
  3. Time:
    6:45 pm – 8:00 pm
    Title:
    Banquet
  4. Time:
    8:00 pm – 8:55 pm
    Title:
    Graphs and Their Potent Energy
    Speaker:
    Hossein Shahmohamad, RIT
    Abstract

    Energy of a graph was defined by Gutman in 1978 and originates from theoretical chemistry. For an n-vertex graph G with adjacency matrix A having eigenvalues \(\lambda_1 \geq \lambda _2 \geq \cdots \geq \lambda_n \), the energy \(E(G)\) is defined as the sum of absolute values of all eigenvalues. Graph Energy has been a topic of great interest in mathematical Chemistry as well as Mathematics. The study of graph energy is deeply related to modeling of spread of epidemics, properties of proteins, the search for the genetic causes of Alzheimer disease, and entropy. In this talk, we present many of the recent discoveries and progresses made on this topic.

  5. Time:
    9:00 pm – 10:00 pm
    Title:
    Math Game Night
    Speaker:
    Ryan Gantner, St. John Fisher University
    Abstract

    All are welcome – including students, faculty, and guests – to participate in lighthearted games. Laughs will be had, prizes will be available, and you just might learn something!

Saturday – Oct 14

Room: Doyle Conference Center

  1. Time:
    8:00 am – 8:30 am
    Title:
    Registration and Breakfast (in the Atrium)
  2. Time:
    8:30 am – 8:40 am
    Title:
    Welcome Address: David Hilmey, Provost and Academic VP
  3. Time:
    8:45 am – 9:30 am
    Title:
    Probabilistic Generative Frameworks for Sampling 3D Complex Shapes and Images
    Speaker:
    Lorin Crawford, Microsoft Research New England
    Abstract

    The recent curation of large-scale databases with 3D surface scans of shapes has motivated the development of computational tools that better detect global patterns in morphological variation. Recent studies have focused on developing methods for the task of sub-image selection which aims at identifying physical features that best describe the variation between classes of 3D objects. A large piece in assessing the utility of these approaches is to demonstrate their performance on both simulated and real datasets. However, when creating a model for shape statistics, real data can be difficult to access and the sample sizes within these data are often small due to expensive collection procedures. Meanwhile, the landscape of current shape simulation methods has been mostly limited to approaches that use black-box inference---making it difficult to systematically assess the power and calibration of sub-image models. In this talk, we present a new statistical framework for simulating realistic 2D and 3D shapes based on probability distributions which can be learned from real data. We demonstrate this framework in two applications within computational biology: (1) cellular imaging of neutrophils and (2) mandibular molars from four different suborders of primates.

  4. Time:
    9:40 am – 10:10 am
    Title:
    Business Meeting
  5. Time:
    10:15 am – 11:00 am
    Title:
    Randolph Lecture: Rethinking Assessment to Encourage Student Engagement and Preserve Instructor Sanity
    Speaker:
    Daniel M. Look, St. Lawrence University
    Abstract

    The COVID pandemic forced instructors to rethink their pedagogy and, in particular, assessment strategies. Although this was difficult work, a biproduct of rethinking assessment for remote courses was a rethinking of assessment in general. What are the purposes of assessment and are there other ways to meet those objectives? I’ll present some of the strategies I have been trying, with varying success, in my upper level mathematics classroom to make assessment more meaningful to students and, if possible, less labor-intensive for instructors (me). Specifically, I’ll discuss a form of self-assessment, combined with slimmed down grading, that I used for Complex Analysis and a contract grading scheme, along with adjusted course policies, that I am implementing in my Real Analysis course.

  6. Time:
    11:05 am – 11:15 am
    Title:
    Group Photo

Saturday – Oct 14

Room: Doyle Conference Center

  1. Time:
    11:15 am – 12:15 pm
    Title:
    Lunch

Saturday – Oct 14

Room: Swan Business Center (various rooms)

  1. Time:
    12:30 pm – 12:55 pm
    Title:
    Contributed Talks
  2. Time:
    1:00 pm – 1:20 pm
    Title:
    Eclipse Viewing Outside (weather permitting)
  3. Time:
    1:30 pm – 2:25 pm
    Title:
    Contributed Talks
  4. Time:
    1:45 pm – 2:25 pm
    Title:
    Listening Session with your Section Chair and Program Chair (Swan Boardroom)
    Speaker:
    Leah Bridgers (SUNY Oneonta), Cesar Aguilar (SUNY Geneseo)
  5. Time:
    2:30 pm – 3:00 pm
    Title:
    Coffee Break & Poster Session

Saturday – Oct 14

Room: Doyle Conference Center

  1. Time:
    3:15 pm – 4:00 pm
    Title:
    Closing Keynote: Fibonacci Determination
    Speaker:
    Darren Narayan, RIT
    Abstract

    This presentation will feature another example where the Fibonacci Numbers surprisingly appear. Here the Fibonacci Numbers are realized as determinants of nested tridiagonal and Hessenberg matrices using basic tools from elementary linear algebra. The talk will also include details of the journey that started with an observation from a talk by Gilbert Strang, and after considerable determination led to publications in the College Mathematics Journal and the Fibonacci Quarterly.