Randolph Lecturers

From Chapter 5 of the History of the Seaway Section by Gary Towsley:  For the Fall meeting of 1990 a new Invited Lecture in Mathematics Education was added to the Saturday morning program. The first speaker in what was to become a series was Peter Taylor of Queen’s University speaking on Calculus: Where are We Going?. At the Spring meeting of 1991, the Executive Committee voted to establish an annual lecture in Mathematics Education, to parallel the Gehman Lecture given in the Spring meeting. The committee then called for nominations for the name of this lecture. At the Spring meeting of 1993 the Executive Committee announced that the lecture would be named The John F. Randolph Lecture in Mathematics Education after the late John Randolph who had had a long and active association with the section as a faculty member at the University of Rochester and Rochester Institute of Technology. The first lecture under this new name was A History of Mathematics Course for Teachers, by Israel Kleiner of York University at the Fall 1993 meeting.

1990

Peter Taylor, Queen’s University
Calculus: Where are We Going?

1991

 
 

1992

William E. Boyce, RPI
Calculus, Computers, and Change

1993

Israel Kleiner, York University
A History of Mathematics Course for Teachers

1994

Patricia K. Rogers, York University
Instructional Transformation and Mathematics Education

1995

 
 

1996

Eric Muller, Brock University
The Impact of Research in Mathematics Education on my Teaching and on the Learning of Mathematics in my Classes

1997

Harriet Pollatsek, Mt. Holyoke College
Math for Poets: Finding Math Lovers Among Humanities Students

1998

Jim Matthews, Siena College
What Every Student of Mathematics Should Know

1999

Bernard Hodgson, Laval University
The Mathematician and the Education of Teachers: Some personal Views

2000

Stephen West, SUNY Geneseo
Mathematics Education: Where Have We Come From? Where are We Going? What’s Taking Us So Long?

2001

Anna Sierpinska, Concordia University
Theoretical Thinking and High Achievement in Linear Algebra

2002

David Henderson, Cornell University
Educational Mathematics

2003

Patti Frazer-Lock, St. Lawrence University
Making Mathematics Meaningful

2004

Eric Robinson, Ithaca College
High School Mathematics Education: Gaining Perspectives on a Fragmented System

2005

David Poole, Trent University
Everybody Wins: Why Mathematics Courses for Elementary School Teachers Matter and How They Can Benefit All Students

2006

There was no Randolph Lecture at this Joint Meeting with the Metro Section

2007

David Bressoud, Macalester College
Calculus in High School

2008

Jack Narayan, SUNY Oswego
Across 50 Years of Teaching

2009

Sam Vandervelde, St. Lawrence University
King Solomon on Teaching Math

2010

Kate Fowler, Clarkson University
K12 Educational Outreach in Mathematics: What? Why? How! WOW!

2011

Tom Pfaff, Ithaca College
Sustain This! Making Math Matter

2012

Jamar Pickreign, SUNY Fredonia
We Teach Math...to People

2013

Kevin Cheung, Carleton University
The Art, Science, and Illusion of Mastery

2014

Carol Schumacher, Kenyon College
What is the Definition of Definition? and Other Mathematical Cultural Conundrums

2015

Laura Person, SUNY Potsdam
Clearing Obstacles to Student Success

2016

Christina Gomez, Ithaca College
Mathematics for All

2017

Yousef George, Nazareth College
IBL for All

2018

John Mighton, Fields Institute at the University of Toronto, JUMP Math
Extreme equality: Using research to close the achievement gap in math

2019

Alison Gibbs, University of Toronto
Navigating Whitewater: Preparing our students for unknown challenges